NEW YORK | 626 Flatbush Ave | 236 FT | 23 FLOORS


#1

Two More Views of Tall Development Planned Near Park in Prospect Lefferts Gardens

by Cate
10/03/13 11:30am

Developer Hudson Companies shared with us two more renderings of the development they are planning for 626 Flatbush Avenue in Prospect Lefferts Gardens. Click through to the jump to see the tower in more detail. What do you think of the design?


#2

July 9 2014
Tectonic


#3

I see columns rising at this site.


#4

Good news! Moved to U/C.


#5

There was a previous lawsuit to try to stop the project. Good that it failed. Hopefully this sets the bar for some more high rises around the park. The location is perfect for it, and from a market standpoint, will sell given the views of Manhattan and the park.


#6

I hope not. I know this is YIMBY but I live in this area and in this case more high rises, especially the cheap looking ones they’re building in Brooklyn, will ruin this area. Flatbush Avenue is already quite congested. Downtown Brooklyn with all its transportation options is still under developed. I hope the zoning changes all around the park.


#7

Rising rapidly


#8

09.05.14


©tectonic


#9

11 21 2014
Tectonic


#10

626 Flatbush Avenue, 23-Story High-Rise on Prospect Park, Tops Out

BY: STEPHEN SMITH ON JANUARY 7TH 2015 AT 6:00 AM


626 Flatbush Avenue, photo by Tectonic

New York City has a long tradition of building towers around the edge of its parks, but the tradition isn’t as proud as it once was. NIMBYism has gripped the city, and even around Central Park – an open space defined by the high-rises on its rim – supertalls have come under fire.

High-rises have been all but banished from Prospect Park, and 626 Flatbush Avenue, which looks to have topped out a block inland from the park in Prospect Lefferts Gardens, will likely be the last major tower to grace Brooklyn’s flagship park. By cobbling together air rights from the unusable scraps of land between the buildings on Flatbush and the Brighton Line tracks that carry the B/Q trains, developer Hudson Companies is building the 23-story rental tower with sweeping views of the park.


626 Flatbush Avenue, rendering by Marvel Architects

The project will bring 254 new apartments to a part of Brooklyn that’s barely seen any development since the 1960s, when a pair of shorter towers were built to the north of here. Twenty percent of the units will be let at deeply discounted rents to low-income families – exact rents will depend on household income, but a two-bedroom apartment will top at at less than $900 a month.

The building is designed by Marvel Architects, and will total around a quarter of a million square feet. It will have two retail spaces of 4,000 square feet fronting on Flatbush (with the rest of the tower set back along the Brighton Line tracks), and a 3,000-square foot community facility space.

While the tower may be the last one to be built on (or almost on) the park, it won’t be the only one in Flatbush. On the other end of the neighborhood, on Nostrand Avenue near Albemarle Road practically in East Flatbush, another 23-story tower is under development by Eli Karp’s Hello Living.

According to the developer, completion of 626 Flatbush is targeted for early 2016.


#11


Credit: HorsePunchKid


#12

https://vimeo.com/153425108#at=0


#13

Interior work is occurring and is almost wrapped up.


Credit: [URL=“http://tectonicphoto.com/”]Tectonic [/URL]


#14

[QUOTE]The 23-story rental building at 626 Flatbush Avenue in Prospect-Lefferts Gardens has revealed its starting prices just days before rentals in the building are due to hit the market. Base rents for the tower, henceforth known as The Parkline, were revealed in an email sent out to stoke renter interest (h/t Q at Parkside.) To the shock and awe of approximately no one, the rents are higher than at least some folks anticipated.

The Marvel Architects-designed tower in low-lying Prospect-Lefferts Gardens gained infamy in the early days of its conception for aspiring to become the tallest building in the neighborhood (It succeeded.) The least expensive rentals among them will start at $2,123/month for a studio and $2,584/month for a one-bedroom. Two-bedroom rentals will start at $3,553/month with three-bedrooms asking from $4,430/month. It should be noted that these prices include one month of free rent on a 13-month lease, at least.

Given its Park Slope-y prices it should be expected that the building comes with amenities to spare, and it does not disappoint. The Parkline will offer an abundance of storage for strollers, bicycles, and anything else residents may have laying around, as well as a penthouse lounge with an accompanying roof terrace for residents.

If unobstructed, 23-story penthouse views of Prospect Park, which sits just one block away, get old, then there’s a “bridge terrace” on the second floor. Other amenities include a private catering kitchen, dining room, gym, yoga room, children’s playroom, theater, on-site parking, courtyard, and a pet grooming cellar (because of course.)

The Parkline’s rental launch signals the beginning of the end of the long, fraught development history at the site. A little sampling: foes of the development staged a rally against its construction that lead to a temporary restraining order on the site against developer Hudson Companies issued in June 2014. The developer halted work on the building until the following June when it was resumed, and the building eventually topped out.

Rentals are expected to hit this market this Friday, so stay tuned for addition details.[/QUOTE]


#15

Moved to completed.


#16

This building came out really nice.


#17

Not sexy…


Tectonic


#18

Testing Tectonic’s new wings…

Gotta keep evolving.


#19

Great work Tectonic. Man you and that drone are dangerous things ya know. I mean, you take killer shots on the ground, and now… the air! :wink:

All we need now is sea.


#20

Lol thanks Chris.