NEW YORK | 470 11th Ave | 780 FT | 47 FLOORS


#1

Continuing the discussion from NEW YORK | Hudson District - Hudson Boulevard Corridor Subdistrict:

Revealed: 470 Eleventh Avenue

BY: NIKOLAI FEDAK ON MAY 5TH 2014 AT 6:00 AM

470 Eleventh Avenue – image by Archilier Architects

The first renderings are up for a new mixed-use tower at 470 Eleventh Avenue, located on the southeast corner of 11th Avenue and 38th Street. Crain’s first reported on the project last month, when developer Black House acquired the parcel; the price of acquiring the lot and air rights was approximately $115 million, and the skyscraper will encompass 320,000 square feet. Images of the building come from Archilier Architecture, which won a competition to design the structure.

470 Eleventh Avenue will stand 720 feet tall, and the tower will have 51 luxury residences and 410 hotel rooms; per Archilier, the skyscraper is inspired by “traditional Chinese lanterns,” and the firm “created a tower of alternating volumes and dramatic terraces and sky pools.”

470 Eleventh Avenue — image by Archilier Architects

Black House is also developing The Soori High Line, which will also boast private heated swimming pools. The firm’s projects certainly have a running theme, though whether the amenity catches on in new developments across Manhattan remains to be seen; regardless, the common thread between Black House developments is certainly unique, and distinguishes their properties from other new buildings coming to market.

470 Eleventh Avenue — image by Archilier Architects

In terms of design, 470 Eleventh Avenue seems a bit cutting-edge for comparisons to traditional Chinese lanterns, but the inspiration has led to a distinct form, with unheard-of amenities. While lower levels are relatively plain, the upper floors — which will house the condominiums — offer an unprecedented take on high-rise living. Instead of isolating inhabitants from the elements, the building is replete with terraces and private pools, which are typically confined to elevations significantly below 500 feet.

470 Eleventh Avenue — image by Archilier Architects

Besides the condominium amenities, the building includes several terraces for the hotel portion, as well as what looks to be a sky-lobby approximately two-thirds of the way up; while most ‘sky lobbies’ are anything but — and are typically enclosed in glass — major portions of the aerie at 470 Eleventh Avenue are literally open-air.

470 Eleventh Avenue — image by Archilier Architects

Though the tower’s massing may be unconventional, the premise behind 470 Eleventh Avenue pushes the envelope of design forward, and will hopefully create an impetus towards integrating more outdoor spaces into New York’s new skyscrapers. Tall buildings are easy to create, but crafting structures that are livable, breathable, and harken back to nature is a step that architecture needs to take — and in that regard, Archilier has succeeded in creating something that breaks boundaries.

470 Eleventh Avenue — image by Archilier Architects

Work on 470 Eleventh Avenue is apparently imminent, as completion is expected in 2017.


#2

More details:

Developer Acquires Hudson Yards Site for Chinese Targeted High-Rise

A joint venture of Siras Development, a New York-based luxury real estate development group and Kuafu Properties, the New York-based Chinese real estate investment and development company, have completed the acquisition of a prime development site in Midtown Manhattan’s Hudson Yards, comprising five adjacent parcels located at the southeast corner of 38th Street and 11th Avenue.

The planned 380,000-square-foot mixed-use project, set to rise on the site directly across from the Jacob Javits Center, will consist of approximately 50 luxury condominium units in the top 15 floors of the tower; a 400-room high-end hotel situated on 20 floors; the Shanghai Club, an exclusive membership club for an anticipated international demographic occupying three floors; office space designed to attract the growing millennial generation workforce, and ground-floor retail and lifestyle space.

“We are in a strong position to meet the demands of the market,” said Shang Dai, Principal of Kuafu Properties, the co-developer and capital provider. “We went into contract for the land at a time when Hudson Yards was beginning to gain prominence as a prime destination. By capitalizing on the timing in the market, we will be able to deliver a superior project designed for what we envision as the new frontier in the New York real estate landscape,” he added. The site was purchased for an estimated $62 million.

Designed by Archilier Architecture, the planned 47-story tower will have a sleek, modern appeal with a distinctive Asian influence.

“As for the hotel component, we retained Jones Lang LaSalle for the RFP process, which is already underway, and we have strong interest from high-end hotel brands that are excited to be a part of one of the strongest hotel markets in the nation,” said Ashwin Verma, Managing Partner of Siras Development. “This project, opposite the Javits Center, close to the Highline and with unparalleled and unobstructed views of the Hudson River promises to be a centerpiece of the area, and will grow in stature as Hudson Yards continues to evolve,” he added.

The Shanghai Club, a highly anticipated component of the project, will have spectacular views of the Hudson River and the Manhattan skyline and will feature private dining facilities with authentic Chinese cuisine, tea house, areas for lounging and socializing including a rooftop bar, a private pool, and other luxury amenities, expected to appeal to Chinese and American business people as well as international buyers who are looking to purchase a lifestyle as well as real estate.

Site preparation is to commence shortly, with groundbreaking slated for the second quarter of 2015.


#3

Great news! John Boehner likes it!


#4

Yea me likes too! :smiley:


#5

Better renderings!

http://www.archilier.com/portfolio/new-york-hudson-yards-mixed-use-development

http://www.archilier.com/sites/default/files/styles/1250x850/public/nyhd1.jpg?itok=-1ilLHzs
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http://www.archilier.com/sites/default/files/styles/1250x850/public/nyhd5.jpg?itok=6S46hlK4


#6

Highline developer has big picture approach to business

By Konrad Putzier on January 8, 2015

The Hudson Rise project at 11th Avenue and West 38th Street has an even more unusual design.

First renderings (Verma said they aren’t final) by the Shanghai-based architecture firm, Archilier Architecture, show a building that looks a bit like stacked Lego blocks.

It also features outdoor staircases and tree-lined terraces. The building will have 410 hotel rooms and 51 luxury condos. As with the Soori, Siras initially partnered up with BlackHouse on the development. Verma reckons the extension of the 7 line will make the development attractive.

“When you buy farm land in developing countries and build a road, the land jumps in value,” he said. He believes the completion of the subway extension will have the same effect on the Far West Side.
For Verma, who came to the US as a teenager and holds a Wharton MBA, the Far West Side is a fairly recent focus.

When he began developing in 2001, he initially worked on Brooklyn brownstones. In 2007 Siras switched to Manhattan, and has since embraced its role as a West Side specialist. Verma can walk to his projects from the firm’s office at West 27th Street, and he lives in Chelsea.

“We love the High Line,” he said. “When areas go through a zoning change, they can absorb beautiful architecture.”


#7

Chinese private equity shop Kuafu seeks $32M in Hudson Yards bonus rights

January 13, 2015
Rich Bockmann

Chinese private equity firm Kuafu Properties is applying for a pair of building-incentive programs for its 47-story, mixed-use condo/hotel it is developing at 470 11th Avenue with BlackHouse Development and Siras Development. The partners are looking to acquire more than 170,000 square feet of bonus development rights at a cost of $31.6 million, which would allow for a project of nearly 320,000 square feet.

The floor-to-area-ratio bonuses will push the 38th Street project, termed the Hudson Rise Hotel, from a base density of roughly 140,000 square feet up to 319,905 square feet, the maximum potential for the site. Hudson Rise will include 42 condo units spread out over nearly 90,000 square feet on top of approximately a quarter of a million square feet of hotel use, right across from the Jacob Javits Center.

Fellow developers, including Eliot Spitzer’s Spitzer Engineering and the Moinian Group, have already tapped into these two pools of bonus rights. Spitzer is building a hotel of more than 400,000 square feet on West 35th Street, while Moinian is building a 1.8 million square-foot office tower known as 3 Hudson Boulevard.

Kuafu has submitted a pair of land use applications to the Department of City Planning, which certifies the project for the bonuses. The first bonus will cost Kuafu $14.8 million, which it will pay to the nonprofit Hudson Yards Infrastructure Corporation to purchase 118,483 square feet of District Improvement Bonuses. The price for those bonuses is fixed at $125.36 per square foot.

The second source of bonus FAR takes a fair bit of calculation. The additional 53,318 square feet of density comes from about 2.5 million square feet of air rights that the city created over the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s eastern rail yards in 2005. The bonuses cost 65 percent of the per-square-foot assessed price of the receiving site.

Moinian has already received the assessment for its office property, which priced the bonuses at roughly $350 per foot. In Kuafu’s case, the rights will cost $315 per square foot, placing the total price at $31.6 million. Representatives for the developer couldn’t be reached for comment.


#8




@Archilier Architecture


#9

I hope this starts soon.


#10

Is this the final version? I think it looks pretty cool the way it is and hope they keep it.