NEW YORK | 30-17 40th Avenue | 10 FLOORS


#1

TYPE: 10-story, 428-unit residential building
LOCATION: 30-17 40th Avenue, in northern Long Island City
DEVELOPER: Lightstone Group
SIZE: 413,000 square feet in total.
RETAIL SPACE: 3,181 square feet on the ground floor.
APARTMENTS: The project will be made up of studios, one-, and two-bedroom units
AMENITIES: 22,000 square feet of amenity space.
ARCHITECTS: Gerner Kronick + Valcarcel
COMPLETION DATE: Completion is expected in 2017.


NEW YORK | Northern Long Island City - The Water Tank
#2

• TYPE: 10-story, 428-unit residential building
• LOCATION: 30-17 40th Avenue, in northern Long Island City
• DEVELOPER: Lightstone Group
• ARCHITECTS: Gerner Kronick + Valcarcel
• SIZE: 413,000 square feet in total
• RETAIL SPACE: 3,181 square feet on the ground floor
• APARTMENTS: The project will be made up of studios, one-, and two-bedroom units
• AMENITIES: 22,000 square feet of amenity space
• COMPLETION: Completion is expected in 2017

Work in progress poster

Site location

New York is the only large American city where these water tower structures are common.

“There’s just nothing that works as well.”

  • Tanks began sprouting up in NY City around 1890’s
  • A water tower is a simple device that uses gravity to provide water pressure.
  • They provide water for domestic uses and fire supply.
  • Most municipalities have tanks that can hold a day’s worth of water for their population.
  • Many New York City buildings exceed the height the infrastructure’s water pressure can handle.
  • Most structures taller than six stories need some sort of water tower and pump system of their own.
  • Water is fed to buildings through pipes in the basement.
  • Electric pumps push the water from the basement to roof.
  • It takes 2-3 hours to fill the average 10,000-gallon tank.
  • From the roof, gravity sends water to pipes throughout the building.
  • As tenants use the water, the level in the tank goes down and, just like in a toilet, a ballcock lets more in.
  • If left unattended, the water within the tanks can stagnate and become a breeding ground for bacteria and E. coli.

“Water tank that is more than an eyesore aesthetically speaking”
“For 150 Years doing something that’s almost obsolete”

  • In this new building a simple utilitarian structure that makes no effort to hide the tank or otherwise incorporate it into the architectural design of the building.

#3

Today, 08/22/2016. The site is huge, could easily hold a fifty story building. Currently, the structure is 4 floors above street level.



#4

11/5

Another very large apt complex, a couple blocks away from where the clocktower project will be.


#5

12/30

Coming along nicely I think. The stone column cladding actually reminds me of all the large warehouse and mfg buildings around long island city. Great fit for this part of the city. The glass is looking pretty good too.

Also found Tec’s office and ride across the st from this development. :wink:


#6

With 400k+ sqft of rights, this could of been a good opportunity for micro units. The city needs to lower the minimum standard for sq-ft/unit.


#7

This morning:

As seen from Honeywell Street bridge:

As seen from Northern Boulevard:

As seen from 39th Avenue just west of 31st Street, looking west

As seen from intersection of 30th Street and 39th Avenue, looking south

As seen along 30th Street between 39th and 40th avenues, looking south:

As seen along 30th Street between 39th and 40th avenues, looking north:

As seen from 40th Avenue between 30th and 31st streets, looking north:

As seen from 31st Street between 39th and 40th avenues, looking northwest:


#8

4/15


#9

Last Saturday evening


#10

JC Heights - your photo has been “curbed”…


#11

Ha nice! Glad they gave credit.

Cheers!


#12

earlier today


#13

7/28