NEW YORK | 200 Greenwich St (2WTC) | 1,348 FT | 88 FLOORS | ON HOLD


#1047

Larry needs to cut a deal.


#1048

We all hope so. It’s time…it’s past time. Thanks Robert!


#1049

I agree, Que.


#1050

I’m starting to think that the problem isn’t Larry or the financials – there must be something intrinsically unattractive to these prospective tenants about the property itself

the trade center towers are already far lower ppsf than comparable buildings uptown


#1051

I think the hordes of tourist along with the sites prominent yet grim history plays on many prospective tenant’s mind.


#1052

#1053

Just read the headline, I think this could be a good strategy. Can’t let all that great infrastructure go to waste. Too bad the LIRR couldn’t be extended to downtown from Atlantic Avenue.


#1054

Tearing down the FDR (or making it Highline II) and making it park space and implementing the Wall Street redevelopment proposal could breathe even more life into downtown, and make it an epicenter for future development.


#1055

Unlike the highline, the downtown part of the FDR is a vital part of the automobile flow through New York


#1056

In the current iteration of New York it is. The city continues to seek ways to reduce car traffic, and studies (and actual implementations) have shown that removing highways actually reduces traffic. Cities like Seoul have removed major arteries and flourished because of it.
The FDR is an impediment to downtown development, is a total waste of prime real estate, and encourages unwanted car traffic. It needs to go, and I think doing so would be an even greater success than the High Line.


#1057

I think it would be a good idea if the west side highway was a real highway. Unfortunately, the FDR is the only highway which passes down the length of Manhattan, and if it were removed it would cause nightmares for the west side and Brooklyn which would cost other areas just as much as it would help FiDi


#1058

If it wouldn’t take a decade, they should bury it.


#1059

I disagree. Manhattan real estate is too valuable. Every inch. And it will only get more valuable. We don’t need highways in Manhattan. We need fewer private cars in Manhattan.

Delivery vehicles, repair and construction vehicles, taxis, Lyfts, busses, shuttle vans… great. Private cars? Not so much. They shouldn’t get free/cheap street parking, and they should face a steep congestion charge entering and leaving Manhattan. Set the incentives correctly and you won’t need highways in Manhattan. Fewer cars, less traffic… win-win.

It’s crazy enough that there’s a huge highway directly into the most transit-spoiled square mile in the whole country. It’s absolute insanity that it’s right on the waterfront. Tear down the FDR and FiDi gets its waterfront back. Quality of life goes up. Win.


#1060

Recently I’ve been noticing a lot of this sentiment in communities about the city, this resentment of the private car or something. But there really aren’t that many… there are basically no other places in America with such low rates of private vehicle ownership and most of them are street parked or garaged at almost every time. The majority of the cars on the roads are service vehicles or out of towners already…
The car people aren’t insanely priveleged or something… it’s absolute misery driving in Manhattan, and people certainly aren’t doing it because they feel like it— there’s usually a good reason they chose to use a car.

Also, the FDR has a pretty small footprint all things considered… there’s not even enough space to build any buildings so much as plant maybe one or two rows of trees or shrubs

I think the important thing to consider is that it doesn’t matter how easy it is to get a train or cab in FiDi, the people driving on FDR S arent going to FiDi— they’re passing through to another destination where perhaps transit isn’t so easy, and they might be originating from a place without transit as well…


#1061

You’re correct that car ownership is very low in Manhattan. People who live and work in the city tend to take transit and walk. Which is exactly why I feel that more of our precious real estate should be used for those modes vs. private cars.

Out-of-towners? Yes, they’re a huge part of the problem. They drive right into the city because that’s what they’re used to where they live, they don’t know any better, and we make it way too easy and cheap. That needs to be discouraged.

People driving through Manhattan, from elsewhere to elsewhere? That’s insanity. But again, yes, people absolutely do it, because the city encourages it, by making it easy and cheap. The Brooklyn Bridge is completely free. It shouldn’t be.

If we fix these things, congestion goes down, the people that truly need to drive onto the island, can, and the FDR becomes less necessary.

It would be a lot more than “one or two rows of trees or shrubs”. I’m a heavy user of the public space on both rivers in lower Manhattan. Going for a run along the Hudson is absolutely delightful. Going for a run under / along the FDR is miserable. It’s a shitty, poorly-maintained space that’s dangerous in the evening. Which is what tends to happen along urban elevated highways almost anywhere in the world. They could tear down the FDR, widen the regular street, and have plenty of room to build a wonderful new river park. It would make a massive difference for all of the neighborhoods it touches.


#1062

But you can’t make it difficult and expensive unless there’s a good alternative for people to use…


#1063

Sure. Transit and something similar to West Street on the Hudson.


#1064

@rbrome 10000000% AGREE - Running on the east side is great until it gets to that sketchy area. TBH I can’t believe the FDR is still even around. The value of that land must be bananas.


#1065

Again, the width of the FDR would make for pretty shallow lots which wouldn’t be great for building


#1066

Four murals seem to be getting made on this base… they’re coming together nicely and the colors will definitely add a lot of energy to the site.

Also, the continuing removal of fencing at the WTC in the last couple weeks is really transforming the space. It’s gonna be a good summer for the area